Chickpea Curry Over Brown Basmati Rice

Something magical happens as the onion and the curry powder bloom over the heat. Flavors come to life, and the stress of the world melts away. These vegan curried chickpeas over brown basmati rice feed body, mind, and soul. It’s one of my favorite recipes, in case you can’t already tell.

I was on the fence about writing about this.  Google chickpea curry and a TON of identical recipes will come up, and mine isn’t all that different.  One of those was what inspired me to cook this for the first time several years ago, but as time passed, the recipe changed.  Now I use fewer ingredients and have upgraded to brown basmati rice (which you can now buy at Aldi grocery stores!).

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Chickpea curry is one of our favorite recipes, and it served to be a huge inspiration to writing about food in the first place.  I clearly remember the day: screaming fussy baby and we’re STARVING.  My husband volunteered to do the cooking for the evening (he was that hungry haha), so I’m calling instructions over the partition between the living room and the kitchen while doing the mom-things that needed to be done.

Me: “Are the onions in the skillet opaque yet?”

Adam: “Yes. Now what do I do?”

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I shout off the next several ingredients off the top of my head, including where to find them in the kitchen, reminding him to shake the can of coconut milk.  I ended up coaching him through the entire dinner process off the top of my head from the other room.

Now maybe that’s something that lots of people can do.  I know several of the women in my family could probably cook a favorite recipe blindfolded.  Adam, however, was apparently impressed.

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After seven years of marriage, I managed to surprise him by doing something unexpected. And that’s a pretty good feeling.

There’s something about getting encouragement from someone you love, someone who knows you better than anyone else, that’s just the little push you need to try something new 

Both Non-Baker and my site broke triple digits in views this month.  We’ve moved beyond just the friends and family who feel loving obligation to read what we write into a small community of kind readers who happened to stop by.

(In case you didn’t know, my sister, Anna, and I realized that we were both flirting with the idea of starting very different food blogs, so we started at the same time.  Check out Anna’s blog sometime!  It’s great!)

So why do I share a recipe that’s been done before on the internet?  Because sharing a recipe is also showing a little piece about who I am.

So enjoy chickpea curry.  Its texture is absolutely perfect, not to mention its flavor.

Ingredients:

  • 1 C brown basmati rice
  • 2 1/4 C water
  • 1 yellow onion, chopped
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp curry powder
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne
  • 1  14 oz can coconut mil
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 1 tbsp hot chili paste (sriracha or other  brand)
  • 2 14 oz cans chickpeas (garbanzo beans)

Instructions:

  1. Cook the rice per package instructions.
  2. Start the onion cooking in olive oil over a medium heat in a large deep skillet.  Stir occasionally.
  3. When onion is opaque, add curry powder.  Allow curry to cook with onion for about a minute to meld the flavors.  Add the cayenne pepper.
  4. Give the can of coconut milk a shake, as it naturally separates.  Pour into the pan.
  5. Add the honey and chili paste.  Let the sauce bubble for a minute or so. (Taste and adjust flavor as needed. Some curry powder and chili paste is more mild than others.)
  6. Drain cans of chickpeas and dump into curry sauce.  Stir to combine.
  7. Serve curry sauce over rice in bowls.  Enjoy!

Something magical happens as the onion and the curry powder bloom over the heat. Flavors come to life, and the stress of the world melts away. These vegan curried chickpeas over brown basmati rice feed body, mind, and soul. It's one of my favorite recipes, in case you can't already tell.
-Brohgan

Vegan “Kartoffelsalat” (German Potato Salad)

Kartoffelsalat, or German potato salad, is traditionally served warm.  Fresh dill, sautéed onion, and a hint of vinegar makes this salad delicious while still being light and nutritious. This salad is a great vegan option and dairy and egg free, perfect for any social gathering or potluck. Break free of the gelatinous supermarket potato salad, and enjoy the freshness of the ingredients that brings everyone back wanting more.

Kartoffelsalat, or German potato salad, is traditionally served warm. Fresh dill, sautéed onion, and a hint of vinegar makes this salad delicious while still being light and nutritious. This salad is a great vegan option and dairy and egg free, perfect for any social gathering or potluck. Break free of the gelatinous supermarket potato salad, and enjoy the freshness of the ingredients that brings everyone back wanting more.

One of my favorite local restaurants here in Manhattan, KS is the Little Apple Brewing Company.  They are known for their beef, and I challenge you to find a better burger than theirs.  Even if you can find a better burger (doubt it), I know you will not find a better combo than a big juicy burger and a side of German potato salad.  Ordering a side of German potato salad with a LABCO burger is how I was introduced to this amazing dish in the first place, and it’s one of my all-time favorite dinners out, which is saying a lot.

This recipe is no copycat of the LABCO German potato salad, and it doesn’t try to be.  Traditional German potato salad uses bacon and its grease, and I imagine the restaurant has no qualms including similar high fat and sodium content in their decadent side dish. Instead, this recipe is much lighter and uses no animal by-products; it’s vegan and allergy friendly!

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For some reason, I recently confidently volunteered to bring potato salad to a dinner function even though I knew some people who couldn’t eat dairy and eggs.  It wasn’t until later that I realized that all my potato salad recipes relied on ranch, sour cream, or mayo.  You know the feeling??

Yup. Gob understands.

I studied vegan potato salad recipes without finding anything that struck my fancy, mostly because I struggled to imagine a non-fried potato in any form not being paired with dairy!  (Baked potatoes without sour cream OR butter OR cheese??! Shudder!)

Inspiration came in the form of a gift from an old man at my community garden.  My garden neighbor generously offered some fresh dill that he was thinning out anyway.  Not really familiar with how to even use fresh dill, I initially took it to be polite, but the dill completely inspired this recipe.  It has never even crossed my mind to grow dill, but I really enjoyed finding ways to use it!  Now I can’t wait to get the stuff in the ground to use again!

I confess, when I made this salad, I didn’t realize until JUST before it was time to leave for dinner that I didn’t have any apple cider vinegar in the house. With no time to buy any, I tasted and eventually served the salad without the vinegar because it was SO GOOD.  I later added the vinegar on another attempt, and the result was a completely a different salad, and both versions are absolutely delicious and very enjoyable!

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Ingredients:

  • 3 lbs yukon gold potato, cubed
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 1/4 C olive oil
  • 1/4 C apple cider vinegar (optional)
  • 2 tbsp fresh dill, chopped
  • Salt and pepper

Instructions:

  1. Cover the potatoes in water in a large pot and bring to a boil.  Cook until completely tender. Drain and transfer to a large bowl.
  2. Meanwhile, heat the olive oil and the onion in a skillet over a medium-high heat, stirring often, until the onion is soft and translucent.  Add vinegar to skillet and remove from heat.
  3. Pour the skillet contents over the potatoes, add the dill, and mix until distributed evenly and potatoes are slightly crushed.  Salt and pepper to taste.  German potato salad is traditionally served warm, but this salad is also yummy cold.

Extra note: Vinegar is the quintessential ingredient when making German potato salad.  However, the vinegar is optional and can be adjusted to taste.  If the hint of vinegar is not a flavor you enjoy, I would recommend only adding a couple of tablespoons or eliminating it altogether.  The salad without the vinegar is still absolutely delicious!  I can’t say it enough!

Best,

Brohgan

Garlic Salsa

This recipe for red salsa leaves out one key traditional ingredient: onions. What’s left is a sweet, tangy blend and a spicy kick that can be adjusted to taste. Fresh ingredients–summer tomatoes, fresh cilantro, lime, fresh garlic–are the key to transforming this recipe from similar-to-jarred into “restaurant quality.” (As my cousin put it. Thanks again, lady!).  Best of all, it only takes a few minutes to make and requires almost no chopping!

This recipe for red salsa leaves out one key traditional ingredient: onions. What’s left is a sweet, tangy blend and a spicy kick that can be adjusted to taste. Fresh ingredients–summer tomatoes, fresh cilantro, lime, fresh garlic–are the key to transforming this recipe from similar-to-jarred into “restaurant quality.” (As my cousin put it. Thanks again, lady!). Best of all, it only takes a few minutes to make and requires almost no chopping!

My grandmother has been known for her gigantic tomato collection for decades.  Ceramic tomatoes, Campbell’s tomato soup signs, tomato shaped mugs, tomato salt and pepper shakers of all sizes, tomato cutting boards, tomato magnets, and so much more decorate every surface her sunny country kitchen.  Now that she’s preparing to sell the farm, my sister, my mother, and I have been photographing and cataloging a lifetime of tomatoes piece by piece.

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My grandpa was known in the family for his love of eating tomatoes.  Maybe that inspired her collection?  I have never asked.

Confession: despite the family history, honestly, I don’t really like tomatoes.  Years of training keeps me from not picking them off burgers and sandwiches.  Let me tell you, I am really the black sheep of tomato enjoyment in my mom’s side of the family.  I like looking at them.  I love the juxtaposition of grandma’s red tomatoes in front of her country green plaid wall paper.  I just don’t feel like eating them.

So when I received a pile of Roma tomatoes in my weekly produce co-op basket, I was less than thrilled…

…until the clouds above opened and the idea for this salsa floated down. Hallelujah salsa!

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I brought this salsa to my grandma’s house for Sunday dinner with the family, and they gobbled it up! (On Sundays only, dinner equals lunch, supper equals dinner. Local Kansas country colloquialism lesson for the day!)

This salsa is a hit!  I’ve had people asking for more!

Ingredients:

-3 garlic cloves

approximately 1/4 c fresh cilantro

-3 Roma tomatoes

-2 jalapeno peppers, seeded (leave seeds in for spicy salsa!! Ay-yay-yay!)

-1 tsp cumin

-1/2 tsp salt

-juice from half a lime (or the whole lime, because it’s yummy that way too)

 

Directions:

  1. Blend cilantro and garlic in a food processor until finely chopped.
  2. Add remaining ingredients and pulse food processor until uniform texture is achieved.  Easy!
  3. Chill and serve cold as dip for chips or a topping on any Mexican flavored dish.  Be prepared for it to disappear quickly!

Creative option:

Adjust to your taste.  If it’s too spicy, add more tomato.  If it’s too bland, add the jalapeno seeds.  If you don’t like cilantro, well, I don’t understand people who don’t like cilantro. But, we can overcome our differences and still be friends, ok?

Side note! For me, I’ve learned that my dislike of tomatoes is limited to heirloom tomatoes.  Even though it seems like the opposite should be true, heirloom tomatoes are the type of tomato that embraces that watery, bland flavor that you find placed on a fast food burger.  The newer strands of tomatoes that have been developed in recent years highlight the acidity and provide actual flavor.  But, I know this is a controversial opinion… you heirloom tomato people are crazy about your watery tomatoes.  Look at it this way: I’m just leaving more available for you to eat!